Goosebumps in Siquijor

Siquijor is one of those perks for us being residents of the Negros island. It’s a province in the Visayas that is only an hour away from Dumaguete and the fast ferry fare only costs around P200. The Spaniards called it Isla del Fuego (English translation: Island of Fire).

Contrary to popular belief, the place itself is just like any other in the Visayas region. Mind you, we only had goosebumps because of the cool waters, that is just to clarify.

However, as soon as you enter Siquijor there are notices on billboards asking the public to not patronize their local healing method called “bolo-bolo“, but as outsiders it only intrigued us more. We just had to see for ourselves how it’s done; the process involved so we could understand it much further.  But if we were to take a wild guess, it’s merely a placebo effect on those who claimed they were healed.

So much so, that there was this media hype about it done by foreigners that really maximized the influx of tourists to the island of Siquijor. Locals of Siquijor have also been progressively capitalizing on it. They may refer you to some healers – one of them is even a politician! But, if you’re looking for true bolo-bolo healers, or the last of its kind, there’s a celebrated personality named Lola Conching Achay (a Siquijor native) who lives in the small village of Tag-ibo in the municipality of San Juan, Siquijor. She was quite an old lady, and we treated her with the respect she deserves.

We were able to visit the entire island of Siquijor by renting a motorcycle at P300 for the whole day. Just ask from your hotel desk to arrange one for you. You will have to fuel it first because the previous user will  have naturally emptied it out to get their money’s worth.

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We even dared to go on a road trip at night to the mountain tops of Siquijor. Pretty scary though, you will hear some birds reacting to the sound of your motorbike from every tree you pass by, creating the effect that you’re being stalked by a lone flying creature.

So here’s Cambugahay falls, one of our many stops on the island.

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Cambugahay falls

We’ve been to many a waterfall in our history as a couple, but this falls was worth remembering.

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It has three equally stunning levels.

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I used to research a lot on this particular waterfalls because I really was itching to go there with my wife. It did not disappoint, it was more than what I expected it to be, and Leny loved it, too.

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Exploring the island only takes a couple of hours. We also came upon a big old tree which is also a popular destination in Siquijor.

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Salagdoong beach

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Sand quality

Others would love to go cliff jumping there in Salagdoong beach. I’ve seen a number of travel bloggers doing it, but no way Jose, I have a crippling fear of heights.

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We might return to Siquijor in the near future. It’s a neighboring province to where we are located and fast ferries going there are cheap. It’s just a matter of time.

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4 thoughts on “Goosebumps in Siquijor

  1. Gerard Jude and LenyGerard Jude and Leny Post author

    @Gabz: thanks for the kind comments bro. Yes, Siquijor is like that and more. :)
    @Ada: I didn’t know you were Ada. Actually, we’re quite familiar with your travel blog! Thanks for dropping by. :)

    Reply

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